New Telly

Do you remember the old TV your gran used to have? It was as deep in the back as the screen was wide. It was probably black and white. It had no remote control – you had to get up and fiddle with the dial to change channel. And it was probably bought in the 50s and lasted 30 or 40 years.

Sadly, these days are no more. Modern TVs have a five-year life span. We were told this when we bought our first flat screen 42-inch plasma TV, not long after we bought our new house, about six years ago. We hung it on the wall, and revelled in the amazing picture quality.

So knowing its life span, we were expecting it to die this year, and I wasn’t too surprised when it went kaput last week. Apparently modern TVs have a finite number of viewing hours. If you’re the sort of person who watches TV a couple of hours a week at most, you can probably make yours last years. The five-year estimate comes from the viewing habits of the average household, watching a few hours a day.

After a week of having to make do with the second smaller TV upstairs, which has only freeview and not the digi-box (and there’s NOTHING worth watching on freeview), and a crap signal which kept cutting out and crashing every five minutes, and no Nintendo Wii because configuring it to a new TV was too much of an effort, our new TV is now installed, in its 47-inch glory, on the living room wall.

And I am impressed. The picture quality is amazing. This one is backlit and blu-ray compatible and has all sorts of other shiny things I haven’t yet figured out. But maybe that’s why things aren’t built to last these days. Technology has become complicated, and disposable. When something breaks down, it becomes easier to buy a new one.

But I am not lamenting over the shortfalls of society. I am too busy basking in the glory of new telly-ness. I have yet to see how Leon of ‘RE4’ will look on this sexy new screen, but I look forward to that moment.

Hubba hubba.

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1 comment so far

  1. Dad on

    those were the days, the whole family , about 20 of us, uncles and cousins, watching the cup final on a 9 inch screen. I think it was only uncle wilf’ who had a tv at that time. I think it was 1953


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